When We Grow Up…

A common question that adults ask children, often as an ice breaker or an attempt at polite conversation, is “What do you want to be when you grow up?” I’ve asked that questions many times, and answered it as many, when I was a child. There’s nothing wrong with that question. However, a few days ago, I saw a quote that greatly intrigued me. It suggested a different question.

Yesterday, I got to pick up three of my grandchildren from school and spend a couple of hours with them. The perfect opportunity arose to ask them this new question.

When We Grow Up

I saw the quote on Instagram. Jaime Casap wrote, “Don’t ask kids what they want to be when they grow up. Ask them what problems they want to solve. This changes the conversation from who do I want to work for, to what do I need to learn to be able to do that.”

Isn’t that an amazing shift in thought and perspective? I love it. I wondered how kids would respond. Would the question about solving problems be too difficult? Would they come up with outrageous answers? Would I get a shrug of shoulders and a “I dunno” answer?

I was about to find out.

After snacks and playing outside in the bright sunshine, catching up on school news and much laughter, the kids settled into playing Minecraft while I watched. I asked them if I could ask each of them a question while they created elaborate houses on a tv screen split three ways.

When We Grow Up

They were immediately attentive as I asked…What problems would you like to solve, as you get older? And then they were thoughtful. Here are their answers:

Joey, age 11: I want to help people live longer and be healthier. This answer led to a lively discussion about how long people could live, if they ate differently and didn’t have the environmental toxins that we currently do. Joey thought way outside the box, wondering if people could attain the extraordinary age of 200, if they took really good care of themselves. Joey has reached an age where he realizes people can and do die, and sometimes at a young age. Underneath his answer is the desire that his family members and friends live long and healthy lives. I loved his answer.

Aubrey, age 9: I don’t want animals to suffer and get sick. I want to take care of them. Aubrey has a tender heart toward all creatures, great and small. In my family there seems to be a genetic disposition toward taking care of and protecting animals. Aubrey has that strong tendency as well. This led to a discussion about what she would need to learn, and do, to solve this problem. I loved her answer.

Oliver, age 10: I want to help animals too. He discussed how he and Aubrey could partner in this endeavor, solving the problems of animal cruelty or healing sick animals, together. Then he said something that brought tears to my eyes. Yaya, I’d like to end world hunger. Is that too big of a problem to solve? Wow. No, I assured him, it’s a big problem, for sure. But we need big thinkers and doers, like you, to solve big problems. We all discussed what could be done, to make sure everyone has enough to eat. Oliver had wonderful ideas. I loved his answer.

I didn’t know how the kids would respond to this different kind of question, and chose to stay open. I was amazed at their sincere and thoughtful answers. I realize these were their answers today. Next week, they might have different problems they want to solve, but what a great launching place for deep discussions about their hearts’ desires.

Oh, how I love those kids and their precious hearts. How blessed I am to journey with them. I will ask them this question periodically, so that I can continue to hear what’s on their hearts and minds. I’ll be asking grandsons Jonathan and Dayan this question as well, and I look forward to their answers.

In fact, any child I am chatting with will get this question from me…what problems do you want to solve as you get older? Join me, in asking the kids in your lives the question, and really listen to their responses. And then look out world, cause here they come, a generation of problem solvers.

When We Grow Up

Series Review: Lost in Space

I was seven years old when the original sci-fi series Lost in Space premiered. A year later, Star Trek beamed into our televisions as well. Although as a teen, Star Trek, in syndication by then, became my favorite show, as a child it scared me. Lost in Space was more child friendly and in spite of the weekly warning from the robot…Danger, Will Robinson…it seemed to present a safer future ahead.

Netflix just released a reboot of Lost in Space, as an original series on its network. All 10 episodes of season one are available to watch. I viewed the first two episodes over the weekend.

Series Review Lost in Space

Lost in Space stars Toby Stephens, Molly Parker, Maxwell Jenkins, Taylor Russell, Mina Sundwall, Ignacio Serricchio, Parker Posey and Brian Steel. The series carries a PG-13 rating, for adult themes and intense actions scenes, and each episode has a run time of 1 hour.

John (Stephens) and Maureen (Parker) Robinson have left Earth behind in the hopes of colonizing a new world with a group of scientists and military personnel. Their three children, Judy (Russell), Penny (Sundwall) and Will (Jenkins) are accompanying them, making it a family adventure.

But in the expanse of deep space, far from Earth and not yet within range of the colony, disaster strikes. The ship transporting the colonists comes under alien attack. Families jettison from the collapsing carrier in smaller Jupiter class ships. The Robinsons crash land on an unknown planet, under harsh conditions.

Series Review Lost in Space

They aren’t alone. Two other survivors, Major Don West (Serricchio) and Dr. Smith (Posey) are also searching for colonists who crashed on the planet. And a synthetic robotic creature (body work done by Brian Steel) crawled out of his downed ship as well. He appears to be the one who caused the mother ship’s destruction, but his circuitry is scrambled, wiping his memory banks. When he encounters young Will Robinson, the two form an alliance and the robot joins the Robinsons.

Series Review Lost in Space

The first priority is survival on the hostile planet as the Robinsons get their small ship operational again. Danger is everywhere, from the unpredictable weather to unstable terrain, and within the lies of some of the survivors, who aren’t who they pretend to be. Even Will’s robotic friend carries secrets that could ultimately threaten them all. Being lost is the least of the Robinsons’ concerns.

In spite of some low reviews that I read, I like this reboot. The original series was fun, although a bit cheesy. This retelling of the story is darker, with more intensity and much, MUCH higher quality special effects. The Robinsons are a more typical family, meaning dysfunctional. Mom and Dad vie for control of their children, creating a great deal of tension between them. There’s the smart med student daughter, the younger daughter who hasn’t discovered her place in the world yet, and the son who feels inadequate for this mission.

Series Review Lost in Space

Series Review Lost in Space

Being only two episodes in, Don hasn’t had much character development yet. And he hasn’t actually connected with the Robinsons, having been abandoned by Dr. Smith, who is female in this newest version. She is a mix of contradictions and manipulations. Sometimes sinister, sometimes pitiable, it will be interesting to watch her work her way into the Robinsons’ favor, while carrying out her own agenda.

I like that Netflix makes all the episodes of a season available at once. I rarely binge watch a show, preferring to draw out the experience by viewing one or two episodes at a time. I’ll savor Lost in Space as it transports me back nostalgically to the 60s, and takes me on an exciting new futuristic adventure.

Series Review Lost in Space

Let’s Go Get Her

I’ve decided a good name for these posts on self care days is Sunday Shorts. The title reminds me to keep it brief, although I’m still working on brevity! I am enjoying unpacking a few thoughts around quotes or memes that catch my attention during the week and inspire me.

Lets Go Get Her

I smiled when I saw a meme that featured a young girl playing in the water. It had these words written across the photo.

Remember her? She’s still there…inside you…waiting. Let’s go get her.

I’ve thought about the truth of those words all week. I was inspired to pull out photos from my childhood and look at the little girl I used to be. I used the quote and one of my own pictures to create a new meme, which is included below.

When did I disconnect from that adventurous child who climbed trees and created stories and marvelously quirky artwork? As I pondered that question, I realized that while I was a creative and imaginative kid, I was also extremely fearful of my intuitive abilities and connection to spirit. Unable to understand my gifts, I tried to contain them, even if I couldn’t block them.

The older I got, the less I wanted to associate with my odd little self. I kept her gifts and her fears secreted away, losing her and important parts of myself.

I am grateful that part of my healing journey the last few years involved facing my fears and embracing all of me, quirks and gifts, sorrows and joys. Little Me had much to teach me. Moving past my fears opened the door in my deepest heart, and there that little girl sat, waiting patiently for me.

Three years ago, on my birthday, my granddaughter Aubrey and I discussed time travel. She was six years old at the time. When I asked her where she would go, if she could travel anywhere, forward or backward in time, her answer surprised me and brought tears to my eyes. “I’d go back to your childhood, Yaya, and be with you when you were a little girl. I’d want you to know I was with you and that you didn’t have to be afraid.”

I was so moved by Aubrey’s answer. And then I took her words to heart. I could go back and be with my younger self, and help us both understand what was going on. I could help my inner child release her fears. Through Julia Campbell’s The Artist’s Way series, I have done much writing about my childhood to help me return to my past. And I’ve spent hours and hours meditating, praying and thinking and ultimately embraced who I was and who I grew to be.

In return, my inner child has offered to me gifts of renewed creativity in all areas of my life, fresh perspectives, the ability to play at a deeper level and that adventurous spirit. I’m still learning from her, and she’s still accepting love and courage from me.

I deeply appreciate that little girl who waited and waited for me to come and get her. What wholeness she brings into my life.

Let’s Go Get Her

National Tea Day 2018

Today celebrates a tradition that I dearly love. Afternoon tea has been a regular part of my day since my first trip to Scotland in 2014. I cherish this pause to savor a cup of tea and relax. It allows me to center myself and reflect on the day, before thinking about dinner prep and evening activities.

My afternoon teas used to feature a variety of Scottish or black teas and the typical fare: finger sandwiches, sweet treats and a Scottish shortbread cookie. None of those foods are part of my diet now. Tea time usually includes an herbal tea or a Scottish heather or thistle blend and fresh fruits and veggies.

In honor of this special day, I tried out a new recipe for a healthy treat, with a surprising ingredient.

National Tea Day 2018

I found this recipe, from Joyfully Healthy Eats, on Pinterest. It is egg, dairy and gluten free.

National Tea Day 2018

Who would have guessed chickpeas could be so versatile and the base for a dough? Instead of rubbing the chickpeas with a paper towel, I picked them up and squeezed lightly, popping them into the strainer. This action left the skins behind. It only took a few minutes and my dough was smooth and creamy. I became proficient at using both hands to pop out the chickpeas simultaneously.

National Tea Day 2018

National Tea Day 2018

I used all organic ingredients and a peanut butter without added sugar. The chips were 70% cacao. Before combining the ingredients in the blender I started a cup of tea steeping. I used dried rose hips for today’s celebratory drink.

The vitamin C in rose hips is the most bioavailable form in existence. Rose hips are anti-inflammatory, increases the blood’s white count and boosts the immune system. They also dissolve biofilm, a jelly like substance caused by the Epstein Barr virus. This biofilm can gunk up vital organs, including the heart, causing palpitations, tachycardia, atrial fibrillation and arrhythmia. Plus, rose hips help to alleviate all types of infections. On this chilly, rainy Saturday, rose hips tea sounded perfect.

National Tea Day 2018

As the herbal tea steeped, I completed the vegan cookie dough and sliced up fresh organic strawberries. I was ready for tea time, in honor of National Tea Day.

National Tea Day 2018

The Chickpeas Cookie Dough was amazing. It wasn’t too sweet, which is ideal for me. I don’t care for sweets anymore. The texture was smooth and creamy and I couldn’t taste the chickpeas at all. The tart strawberries created a wonderful contrast to the dough.

I enjoyed this special tea time this afternoon. I will fix the Chickpeas Cookie Dough again, although it will be an infrequent treat. I prefer to stick with whole foods primarily.

Catherine Douzel says, “Each cup of tea represents an imaginary journey.”

I love that. Where shall I journey to today?

National Tea Day 2018

The Wooden Shoes

During World War II, a young American soldier dozed in Holland. He was exhausted from building bridges to aid the movement of troops, and rebuilding those bridges when they were destroyed.

He stirred from his slumber, awakened by a clip clop sound that drew closer and closer. A woman walked by, wearing wooden clogs. Enchanted, he purchased a small pair of wooden shoes to take home as a gift to his little niece, Patty Jean.

The Wooden Shoes

Young Patty had recently lost her father in a tragic accident. That man was the soldier’s older brother. The soldier, whose name was Lloyd, was determined to get safely home and deliver the clogs to his niece, who always called him Aunt Lloyd, instead of Uncle. He wanted to see her face brighten with a smile, and ease her sadness.

Lloyd did indeed make it home from the war, after serving his country with bravery and honor. And he gave Patty Jean the brightly colored wooden shoes, which she loved.

That little girl was my mother.

The Wooden Shoes Uncle Lloyd, looking handsome in his uniform.

The Wooden Shoes Patty Jean holding the flowers, age four, and her little brother Benny.

I’ve heard the story about my grandfather’s untimely death many times. His truck slid off an icy road and into a pole. He left behind a young wife and three small children. And just as many times, I’ve heard the story of the wooden shoes that “Aunt” Lloyd brought home from Holland.

Those clogs brought great joy to that little girl, during a difficult and confusing time. My mother loved the shoes so much that she cared for them and took them wherever she went. How many moves did those shoes make, long after my mother outgrew them? How many shelves have they rested upon?

My sisters and I wore those shoes when we were little, clip clopping with delight through our childhood home. Our children wore them too, our daughters and our sons, when they were small and visited their grandmother. And when my mother moved for a time, to Mesa, Arizona, the wooden shoes came to live with me.

The Wooden Shoes

The Wooden Shoes

The shoes have always been on display in my home. When my children were still young we followed the Dutch tradition at Christmas time, filling the shoes with tiny wrapped gifts, candy canes, and poinsettia blossoms. The wooden clogs remain a part of my Christmas decor each year. Now I simply light a tea light candle in a red and green ceramic holder and place it near the shoes.

My grandchildren were the next generation to clip clop around the house in the wooden shoes, which are now faded with the passing of time. What joy those shoes still bring. Uncle Lloyd, who is gone, would be thrilled to know that his gift has brightened so many lives.

The Wooden Shoes

In stories, shoes are often imbued with magic. Cinderella left her distressing life behind, thanks to a pair of glass slippers. A little girl named Karen couldn’t stop dancing in her red shoes. And Dorothy discovered at the end of the yellow brick road that her shoes had the power to take her home all along.

My mother’s wooden shoes are magical too. They are enchanted with love…the affection of an uncle for his niece, and the adoration of a little girl, who missed her daddy, and looked up to the man who so reminded her of him.

That love has remained within those clogs for almost 75 years. And every pair of feet that slid into the shoes experienced joy as they clopped around, their hearts surrounded by love as surely as their feet were encased in wood.

What a legacy, Uncle Lloyd, your kindness created. Someday another generation of children will dance in those clogs, and hear the story of the wooden shoes.

The Wooden Shoes

First Visit to Bookhouse Cinema

I was excited to learn that Joplin’s newest theater opened last weekend. Bookhouse Cinema, located at 715 E. Broadway, is an independent theater, showing indie films, documentaries, classics and other non mainstream movies. I have hoped for a long time for just such a theater in Joplin. Late this afternoon I had the privilege of visiting Bookhouse Cinema for the first time.

First Visit to Bookhouse Cinema

Greg accompanied me on this adventure. We selected a 5:15 showing of the film Oh Lucy! and arrived early enough to look around before the movie started.

The beautiful theater room is located in the center of the building. On one side is the lobby where tickets are sold. On the other side is a charming pub where appetizers, meals, drinks and snacks can be purchased.

First Visit to Bookhouse Cinema

The pub was very homey and welcoming with lots of light streaming in through large windows. Bookhouse offers an amazing selection of foods and drinks that can be enjoyed in the pub or carried into the theater. I was delighted to see plant based options available including homemade hummus and beet chips.

Greg and I shared a hummus platter with veggies and specialty crackers. It was fun to carry our platter and tall glasses of lemon/lime water into the theater. The room was very comfortable as were the theater seats.

First Visit to Bookhouse Cinema

First Visit to Bookhouse Cinema

Retro concessions commercials played on the big screen. And I loved when a countdown started. As the number 5 appeared on the screen, a voice announced “Five minutes before showtime!” That immediately took me back to my childhood and watching Saturday matinees in Tulsa.

As the previews began, the double doors on either side of the room were closed, effectively blocking out light and noise as the room darkened. It was showtime!

First Visit to Bookhouse Cinema

Oh Lucy! is a Japanese/American film starring Shinobu Terajima and Josh Hartnett. It was directed by Atsuko Hirayanagi, who wrote the story and created a short film by the same name before producing the feature film. This comedy drama has a run time of 1 hour and 36 minutes.

Setsuko (Terajimo) is stuck in a mundane life, going to work day after day, watching television in her tiny cluttered apartment at night. She is incredibly bored and feels she has missed out on having a husband and a family. Her life changes when she meets John (Hartnett), an American in Tokyo teaching English. His teaching style is friendly and unorthodox. He assigns Setsuko the name Lucy and gives her a blond wig to wear.

First Visit to Bookhouse Cinema

When she is being Lucy, Setsuko feels herself opening up and enjoying new experiences such as hugs. She is shocked, however, when she eagerly shows up for a class, only to discover that John has quit teaching and returned to the United States.

Reluctant to settle back into a routine she hates, Setsuko flies to LA, with her sister, to find John and declare the feelings she realizes she has for him. Oh Lucy! is a heart touching film about a woman’s search for herself that begins as an outward journey and then turns inward.

I so enjoyed Bookhouse Cinema. Films are offered Wednesday through Sunday, with three showtimes every day except Saturday, when there are four. Two to three different films are featured each day. The schedule and list of movies can be found on the Bookhouse Cinema Facebook page. Tickets are $8 and appetizers and meals range from $4 – $10.

If you enjoy indie films and amazing documentaries, charming decor and quality, freshly prepared food, visit Bookhouse Cinema. Welcome them to Joplin, and stop by often, to support this wonderful theater.

First Visit to Bookhouse Cinema

Manga Teen Boy Profile

I made the decision early this morning to get into my manga workbook this evening and continue my sketching lessons. That proved to be a good decision, as I had a busy day. I have a story I want to tell, by way of drawings in a cartoon panel format. Manga is is preparing me for that project.

Manga Teen Boy Profile

This practice has been valuable for me. My skills are increasing. I am much more at ease as I sketch and I’m finding the sessions fun and even relaxing.

Manga Teen Boy Profile

Here is tonight’s lesson.

Manga Teen Boy Profile

In contrast to the teen girl profile, the boy’s features are more angular. The eye is smaller and set back a bit more from the edge of the head.

Manga Teen Boy Profile

I drew guidelines to help me correctly place the eye, nose, lips and ear.

Manga Teen Boy Profile

The jaw is more squared off. The mouth is suggested with a simple line. The lips protrude slightly.

Manga Teen Boy Profile

The eye gets a highlight and definition is added to the ear. The hair flops over the forehead and eye and closely follows the contours of the skull.

I truly am enjoying these creative sessions. I have been able to draw a face looking straight ahead or at a slight angle. Profiles, looking up or looking down were more challenging. These easy to follow lessons are helping me tremendously with perspective and placement.

I was impatient to move to the next section of the workbook, but the additional practice has been great for me. I have a couple more lessons featuring the teen boy and then it’s on to drawing the body. I’m looking forward to sketching a whole person!

Manga Teen Boy Profile

A Cane Without An Owner

In Dickens’ classic story, A Christmas Carol, Scrooge asks the Ghost of Christmas Present about Tiny Tim’s future. “I see a crutch without an owner”, was the grim reply, indicating young Tim would succumb to his crippling illness if things did not change.

I have a cane parked in a corner of my bedroom. Yesterday, as I tidied up my room, I paused to pick up the cane, feeling its weight and running a hand over the smooth wooden surface.

A Cane Without An Owner

When my left leg began to deteriorate in 2015, after years of chronic sciatica and pain, I had to resort to using a cane. It didn’t just aid my walking. I also used the cane when I sat, to support my extended leg. If my knee was bent for long, the joint locked up, requiring half an hour or longer to straighten it.

When my right leg began deteriorating too, I didn’t know what to do. The medical community had given up on me a long time ago. I asked God for help. The next day I read a post by Anthony William, known as the Medical Medium, about how trauma, such as a car accident, can result in an injury that does not heal. My life shifted that day. I found hope and information for healing.

A Cane Without An Owner

My Halloween costume in October 2015. I was a tourist. The cane was a necessity, not a prop.

One week after adopting a plant based lifestyle and following what is called Medical Medium or MM Protocol, I stopped using the cane. I kept going with this new way of living and never looked back, healing the severe sciatica and ending the pain I had lived with for more than 20 years.

I’ve kept the cane as a reminder of the woman I used to be, the one who struggled with pain and poor health. That woman no longer exists, so in that sense, the cane is truly without an owner. I am grateful for healing and the journey that continues.

I also keep the cane nearby because it was made many years ago by Grandpa Moore. He carved the cane from a piece of a Dogwood Tree. Holding the cane yesterday, I wondered about the significance of that. I discovered that Dogwoods are strong, even though their branches twist. The tree symbolizes stability and determination. And because it blooms in the spring, it represents rebirth and new beginnings. Isn’t that amazing? I wish I could ask Grandpa Moore if he knew any of that when he selected this piece of wood.

A Cane Without An Owner

I no longer need the cane, which was once my crutch. When I look at it now I feel gratitude for the stability it offered when walking was difficult for me and for the determination it infused me with to keep going, to never give up.

I feel deep joy for the new beginning that I have had. My life has changed drastically since the day I cried out for help. And I feel such compassion for those who are where I was a short time ago. To those who are suffering poor health or are in pain, I offer hope. And I offer the energy of the Dogwood Tree.

A Cane Without An Owner

Movie Review: I Can Only Imagine

I have long been a fan of the band, MercyMe. I own several of their CDs and one of my favorite songs of theirs, called Beautiful, is on my iPhone. I listen to it any time I need a reminder about my worth. I also love the song that launched this group…I Can Only Imagine. Like many other people, I listened to it on repeat when it released in 1999.

I love too that a film released recently that tells the story behind the song, listed as the best selling Christian single of all time. I attended a matinee showing yesterday, with my mom and sister Linda.

Movie Review I Can Only Imagine

I Can Only Imagine stars Dennis Quaid, J. Michael Finley, Brody Rose, Trace Adkins, Madeline Carroll and Cloris Leachman. This family drama based on a true story, directed by Jon and Andrew Erwin, is rated PG for some adult themes, including abuse, and has a run time of 1 hour and 50 minutes.

Young Bart Millard (Rose) may be just a kid who rides his bike and likes to make things from scraps, but he’s already had to learn to cope with difficult things. Life is hard at home, and it becomes even harder after his mom leaves while Bart is away at camp. Bart’s dad, Arthur (Quaid) is an alcoholic who is bitter and angry about the way his own life has unfolded. The career he hoped for in football never materialized. He expresses his frustration by being verbally and physically abusive to his wife and young son.

Movie Review I Can Only Imagine

Bart finds solace in music, drowning out the world by popping on headphones and listening to his favorite cassettes. As a youth, Bart (Finley) attempts to please his father by playing football. But when an injury ends his chances of playing, Bart turns to the high school glee club as an elective class.

His disappointed father sees another football career disappear before it even started, sending him into fits of rage. The only support Bart receives is from his girlfriend Shannon (Carroll) and his Memaw (Leachman).

Bart’s life shifts when his music teacher discovers he can sing. He performs the lead in the school musical and begins to sing regularly at church. As soon as he graduates, Bart leaves home, anxious to be as far from his abusive father as possible.

Movie Review I Can Only Imagine

When he meets some young men looking for a lead singer, Bart joins the group, and even comes up with the name for the new band…MercyMe. Memaw inspired the band’s name. When Bart told her he was joining a band she exclaimed, “Mercy me, get a real job!”

The group travels across the US in a renovated bus, playing any gigs they can get. Life on the road is hard, but the guys work on putting together their own unique sound and catching a break. An opportunity for bigger venues comes when a talent agent, Scott Brickell (Adkins) listens to a performance and offers his help. He encourages the band to find their song by finding their soul.

Movie Review I Can Only Imagine

But the record labels that come to the Nashville show aren’t impressed enough. They see potential but feel the group still has work to do. Bart considers quitting on his dream. He feels he has failed, just as his father predicted he would.

Brickell very wisely sees that the relationship between Bart and his father is preventing the singer/song writer from finding his true voice. Bart makes the difficult decision to return home and settle things with his dad.

Movie Review I Can Only Imagine

Arthur is a changed man, and a dying man. Diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer, Arthur asks for forgiveness from his son. Everything that Bart has done before pales in comparison to giving his dad what he requests. Arthur has been reading a Bible, and working on the shabby house. He knows his time is short. Is there time enough to heal the relationship with his son and find peace before he dies? And is Bart willing to forgive?

This was an excellent film. I like movies based on true stories, and I always appreciate learning the story behind a song. At its core, this is a story about forgiveness and redemption and restoration. It teaches that amazing gifts flow from a healed heart, a whole heart, gifts such as the song I Can Only Imagine. Bart was inspired by his father, and words that Memaw spoke at the funeral, when he wrote the lyrics in ten minutes.

If you’ve always wondered how the song came about, or if you want to watch a family oriented movie that features redemption and restoration, catch I Can Only Imagine at the theater. You will be inspired.

Listen to the song HERE

Movie Review I Can Only Imagine

This Is What’s Important

This brief Sunday post could qualify as a follow up to Friday’s, on following my heart. This part 2 presents thoughts around an Iain Thomas quote that focuses on how crucial it is to protect what’s important to the heart.

This Is What’s Important

I can feel the deep truth of this quote. Isn’t there always something vying urgently for our attention and calling out for our assistance? There are many important issues in the world, alarming news headlines grabbing for us from social media and so many people, causes and programs that need help. Energetically, there are flashing arrows pointing at all of them, saying…this is important!

And don’t even start thinking about things to worry about!

Unless we choose what to devote our time and attention to, we can easily get overwhelmed. I have often overcommitted my time to projects that are indeed important, but not in alignment with my heart’s desires. The result is burn out on my part or an eventual disconnect and pulling back from what seemed important but was in reality someone else’s cause or desire.

I love Iain’s words that create the image of yanking back my hand and placing it over my heart as I say no, this is what’s important. My heart’s desires guide me in the direction I need to go, direct me in which interests to pursue and what to focus my energy on.

It helps to keep a mental or physical list of what’s important, what my heart’s desires are, such as the list I shared Friday. I can weigh what others say is important for me to do against what my heart says. When there is alignment, I can choose to devote time, money, or energy to that which calls for my attention. When there’s not, I can touch my chest over my heart and more easily say, no…this is what’s important. This is what matters to me.

I love protecting my heart in this way.

This Is What’s Important