Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated

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This is a paid affiliate partnership with Decocrated. All opinions are my own.

Here in the Midwest, spring is fickle, showing up warm and pleasant one day and giving the cold shoulder the next. Additionally, many people are sheltering in place, to help slow the spread of the Coronavirus, limiting traditional spring activities.

The good news is, we can welcome the season into our homes by creating spring vignettes with Decocrated. With this subscription box company, spring is delivered, literally, to our front doors.

For more information about Decocrated Curated Home, check out my recent review. And then discover the versatility of decorating with the spring Decocrated pieces.

Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated title meme

The Spring Curated Home

Decocrated staff works year around, researching trends, watching HGTV and scrolling through Pinterest, curating the best in home decor so that their clients look like decorating pros. Subscription boxes ship out at the beginning of each season, offering fresh decor pieces to incorporate into any decorating style. Each season’s pieces mix well with previous boxes and items you already own.

The spring collection is built around a palette of dusty blues and soft blushes, with accent colors of green, black and gold. It’s the perfect transition from the cozy colors of winter to the soft stirrings of spring.

Spring’s featured artist is Kelly Merkur. Kelly believes that femininity and strength coexist beautifully and she draws inspiration from that truth. Color is an important element of her work and she enjoys creating art through experimentation without restriction.

Kelly Merkur Spring Decocrated Artist
Kelly Merkur Decocrated Spring Artist

Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated

My home is more than 120 years old. Over the years we’ve updated portions of it, adding central heat and air, opening up rooms and building a front deck. However, the house retains its vintage charm. The ceilings are high, the windows huge and the original wood floors bear the marks of time.

My decorating style is eclectic, a combination of farmhouse, modern and vintage. I absolutely love combining pieces in fresh and interesting ways, creating vignettes that tell stories.

Decocrated perfectly supports my decorating style. Opening each box is a delight as I pull pieces out and oooooh and aaaaah over them. My creativity fires up as I mentally sort through what I already own, imagining a variety of fun combinations.

Using items from the Decocrated spring box, I focused on three primary areas: the entry table, the armoire and chair next to the entry table and a top shelf on a bookcase.

Entry Table Spring Vignette
Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated – the entry table

The Entry Table

Beneath a 1914 E. Ingraham pendulum clock, that works only when it wants to, rests my little entry way table.

Top Shelf

The small chippy table next to my front door is fun to decorate. I change the decor on its two surfaces at least six times a year, in accordance with seasons, holidays and my mood.

For this season of rebirth, I began by using the pillow cover from the winter Decocrated box as my foundation. The flip side of the cover is a plain, deep rose color, perfect for the pieces from the spring box.

The abstract framed art piece from Decocrated is the focal point with its vibrant colors. I added a couple of my own books, Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert and The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo. Books make excellent risers, stacking to create height. I chose these two books for their soft colors, which match the print well. And, I smiled when I realized both books contain the word “magic” in their titles. Perfect.

A small vintage brass basket filled with speckled eggs rests atop the books.

The gold tabletop organizational set from Decocrated completes the vignette. Perfect for sorting artist brushes and pencils, organizing office supplies or holding flower buds, the set is versatile. Separate the pieces or group them together. I used three of the canisters in the tray, adding artificial flowers and a white candle.

Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated table top
Table top vignette

Lower Shelf

For the lower shelf on my chippy table, Decocrated’s metal lantern with a black finish anchors the vignette. Dress this piece up with floral picks or down with a simple candle. I added a white pillar candle and a playful candle ring.

The fourth gold canister from the tabletop set finds a home on the lower shelf. I dropped a sprig of artificial flowers into it. And the tabletop sign from the winter box completes this vignette. The opposite side features a cozy winter print. This side simply states, “there may be no thing greater than a life well loved.” What a great daily reminder.

Beneath the vignette a vintage doily covers the shelf.

Lower Shelf Spring Vignette
Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated – lower shelf

The Wooden Chair and Armoire

Next to the entry table, and wedged into a corner between two long windows, is a large wooden armoire. It features various drawers and shelves, one of which holds a television. A vintage wooden chair props open one of the armoire doors.

The Decocrated spring box contains a burlap tote, with the words “It’s what’s inside that counts” printed on it. I love it! For the past year I’ve consciously reduced plastic use. This roomy bag is perfect for toting groceries home from the store or holding my laptop and vast assortment of notebooks, pens and journals when I’m on the go again. It means a lot to plant based me that the bag is fashioned from sturdy burlap and a faux leather strap.

I hung the burlap bag from the top of the armoire door. Grouped on the wooden chair beneath the bag is my straw gardening hat, and a pillow sporting a teal blue cover. Decocrated provides two such pillow covers in the spring box. A standard 16″ or 20″ pillow insert fits within each cover.

The other teal blue pillow found a place among small pillows topping an old folded quilt, in my grandfather’s WWII army trunk. I moved that rusty trunk in front of the armoire during the holidays and I’ve left it there for now.

I enjoy looking at this whole area, seated across the room in my favorite chair. The flow of colors and textures appeals to me and I appreciate how the Decocrated pieces blend with my own. And, that bag is easily grabbed on my way out the door, making it practical as well as decorative.

Armoire Vignette
Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated – armoire and vintage wooden chair

Bookcase Shelf

This three shelf bookcase, in the dining room, holds very few books. I commandeered it from Greg a couple of years ago, removing the books so I could create more vignettes on the shelves. I rearrange these shelves with the seasons and holidays, as I do most surfaces in my house.

Currently the lower two shelves hold travel related items. The top shelf switched over to a playful spring vignette, featuring items from the winter and spring Decocrated boxes.

Included in the spring box are two 4″x6″ prints. One is double sided, with “Live in Color” printed on the abstract side and on the other, an artistic heart with “Home is Where My Heart Is”. The welcome postcard also doubles as a cute print.

I framed the “Live in Color” print and tucked it into a rustic wood and metal tray, stood on its side. Greg makes these and they are so cute! The trio of ceramic trees, from the Decocrated winter box shares space perfectly with the print. I love those trees and intend to use them throughout the year.

The Decocrated magnetic chalkboard is fun and practical. It’s accompanied by six colorful art magnets that perfectly secure note cards, shopping lists, or photos. For the spring vignette, the board has a home on the top shelf of the bookcase. The “Love Every Little Thing You Do” postcard inspires me, as do the two artist cards from my trip to Edinburgh.

I’ll be moving the board into my creative studio soon, where it will keep me organized with notes, inspirational quotes and dates to remember.

Completing this spring vignette is a rustic wooden birdhouse and two bright red ceramic birds. A simple red and white linen defines the space.

Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated bookcase shelf
Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated – bookcase shelf

Get Your Decocrated Spring Box

I enjoyed creating these spring vignettes with Decocrated. The pieces are so versatile and work well with any decorating style. I love that I can keep using them, season by season, incorporating new Decocrated items with the ones I have. Plus, I can include my own decor pieces and vintage finds just as easily. Stay tuned for Easter vignettes, featuring vintage holiday pieces and Decocrated spring decor.

It’s so simple to receive Decorated subscription boxes, right to your door. You too can create your own vignettes, that tell your unique stories.

Click this link for the Decocrated spring box, and use this discount code for 10% off the price of your first box: CINDYLAUDERDALEMOORE10 or use code CINDYLAUDERDALEMOORE30 for 30% off a yearly subscription.

I’d love to see what you create!

Creating Spring Vignettes with Decocrated pillows

 

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Front Porch Reset Using Vintage Metals

This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my Disclosure Policy for details.

Over the past week, I created new vignettes throughout the house, celebrating the arrival of spring. I love the creative process of decorating with what I have, combined in fresh new ways.

The front porch patiently waited its turn for a new look. This afternoon, on a balmy, breezy day, I completed a front porch reset, using vintage metals.

I knew I desired a very different look on the covered front porch. The spring décor I’d used for several years no longer “sparked joy”. A collection of vintage metal pieces DID spark joy and piqued my interest as well. My daughter Elissa gifted me recently with a vintage metal tray and two old toolboxes, that she no longer wanted. These new-to-me items became the focus of the front porch reset.

Front Porch Reset Using Vintage Metals

Start with a Blank Canvas

Here is my step by step process, for creating an interesting new look on the front porch. I did not purchase any new items, preferring instead to use what I already own. It’s a game I play, a creative form of having fun while accomplishing a necessary task.

Play along with me!

I cleared the entry way table near the front door. Greg brought home this table from a job site. The owner no longer wanted it and the table sat forlornly, waiting for trash pickup. Greg added a brace at the bottom, for stability. This free piece began as a red table, moved to my daughter’s house for a time, then returned to me, and became yellow.

This afternoon I wiped it down and added a woven table runner, to break up the surface. Above the table I hung a gardening sign painted in the colors I wanted to feature.

Front Porch Reset with Vintage Metals

Create Central Vignette

Here’s how the creative process works for me. I look at the item I’m working with, and allow ideas to pop up. It’s actually more of a mental download. I “see” what the finished project looks like, then move step by step toward the outcome I desire.

The metal tray, with bits of scruffy blue paint still intact, became the focal point.

In my mental image, I could see the tray filled with a variety of metal and glass containers, suitable for holding tealight candles. After gathering containers and playing with arrangement, I wrapped a rusty metal star garland around the tray.

Front Porch Reset with Vintage Metals

Add Additional Elements

Once I completed the central vignette, I looked through my vintage metals for additional elements to add. Typically I use the “rule of three” for groupings. In this case, I added an old blue toolbox at one end of the table and partnered it with a stone bird candle holder.

On the other end of the table, I grouped three metal items together: a vintage gas can, a small decorative bucket and a mesh candle holder. These items anchored either end of the table and completed the table top.

Front Porch Reset Using Vintage Metals

Let There Be Light

Pleased with this unconventional display, I stepped back to get the overall effect. I realized opening the lid of the blue toolbox would allow me to accomplish two things: the open box created height at that end of the table, and I could drop candles inside the interior.

Light is an important element in all of my vignettes. I find ways to include unscented tealights primarily. Lighting the candles as twilight falls brings a coziness to my home. That’s the hygge element that I love. Read about the Scandinavian custom of hygge here. And get spring hygge ideas here.

Front Porch Reset Using Vintage Metals

Bench Vignettes

My daughter also gave me a rustic wooden bench. I’m excited to cluster potted plants on it and around it,  in a couple of weeks. This afternoon I created simple vignettes on either end of the bench.

The old copper container, repurposed into a flower pot, is empty now. Soon it will cradle flowering plants. I drilled a hole in the bottom of the pot, so water can drain. The old southwestern style flower pot, a special piece from my childhood, came out onto the porch today. I placed it near the bench, in a sheltered spot to protect it.

The metal scoop belonged to Greg’s grandparents. Grandma Ruby painted it, making it perfect for this grouping. And next to the old green toolbox is an antique bulb planter that I still use.

Front Porch Reset Using Vintage Metals

Steps to Creating with What You Have

To create your own unique vignettes follow these simple steps:

  • Make creation a playful game. Whatever you create is perfect and an expression of who you are.
  • If you so desire, only use items that you already own. I find this challenge to be fun. The process causes me to think outside the box, and use pieces in fresh new ways. There’s nothing wrong with buying items. Watch for after season sales, flea market finds or visit yard sales to pick up amazing pieces at low prices. Here’s a great buy on Bell mason jars, which I use for many purposes.
  • Pick a theme based on colors, elements such as wood, metal or glass, or a season such as spring. I typically start with color. Every item I choose, as I add pieces, supports the theme or complements it.
  • Look through all your items and collections, with the theme in mind. I wander around my house, thinking. I have a closet full of small items that I rotate in my décor. However, I’m not limited to using those pieces. I may “borrow” a piece from the living room, the creative studio or even the backyard garden. Think big!
  • Gather all items that might work and play with arrangements. Let your imagination guide you. What you create is an extension of your wonderful creativity. No vignette is wrong. All that matters is that you enjoy it!
  • Once items are placed to your satisfaction, congratulate yourself, take a photo of your creation, and enjoy the fruits of your efforts!

Front Porch Reset Using Vintage Metals

Front Porch Reset Using Vintage Metals

I’m happy with this front porch reset. As darkness fell, I lit the candles and smiled.

My front porch looks fresh, whimsical and fun. This is a totally different look, one I’ve never done before. And doing something new, as often as I can, is one of my things.

I love going beyond the ordinary. How about you?

Front Porch Reset Using Vintage Metals

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The Texture of My Life

In these weeks after Christmas, my house is in a sad state. I love the Christmas décor, and when it’s packed away, the rooms feel empty and somewhat bereft. After I put my creative studio to rights, so I can work in a supportive environment, I turn my attention to the rest of the house. I like to freshen things up, as everyday items are brought back out. So it becomes a bigger project than just returning pieces to where they were before Christmas. 

I enjoy such creative challenges!

The Texture of My Life, Using Symbolism in Creating Vignettes
My first inspiration came for the vintage suitcase in my bedroom. An idea formed for a new vignette when I picked up a little tea pot and cup set for one. Adorned with butterflies and dragonflies, I was gifted with this cute set after the Halloween party at my niece’s house. 

Both the butterfly and dragonfly hold significance for me. Both have been symbols representing my journey in previous years. I was thoughtful as I held the tea set. And then peered into the bedroom at the empty suitcase. A vignette created by using these two symbols strongly appealed to me. 

The Texture of My Life, Using Symbolism to Create Vignettes

I had fun gathering items I already own, with butterfies or dragonflies on them. Greens and blues were the predominant colors. I assembled a variety of pieces and played with arranging them. 

The butterfly painting belonged to Greg’s mother. As did the green glass bottle beside the suitcase and the little brass baskets. Greg bought the metal dragonfly for me in 2013, my year of believing. The fabric is a silk pillow case with appliquéd butterflies, that I found in the bottom of a chest, as we were packing up Greg’s parents’ house. It is delicate, and beautiful. I wish I knew more about its origins. I bought the dragonfly plate in 2013. The green candle was left over from Christmas this year. 

The Texture of My Life, Using Symbolism in Creating Vignettes
The Texture of My Life, Using Symbolism in Creating Vignettes 

I enjoyed creating this unusual vignette. This is the first time I’ve created one so strongly connected to symbols from my past. The butterfly was from my Year of Transformation in 2010. It represented change, growth, emergence and beauty. 

And the dragonfly from 2013, my Year to Believe, is symbolic of walking in two worlds, transformation, wisdom, joy and adaptability. I look at this vignette and recognize how important these years, and their symbols, were to my journey. I see, from my current vantage point, how far I’ve come and how much I’ve grown. This vignette, which is so imbued with symbolism, now represents crucial milestones in my journey, making it a special symbol in its own right. 

The Texture of My Life, Using Symbolism in Creating Vignettes
Alfred North Whitehead says, “Symbolism is no mere idle fancy…it is inherent in the very texture of human life.” 

Symbolism has been an important part of my journey. The symbols for each year come to me by way of synchronicities and repetition, and give me guidance for the months ahead. There is deep meaning for me in each one, and many ahas and magical moments connected to these little signposts scattered along my life path. They assure me that I am headed in the right direction and contribute to my ongoing conversation with the Divine. 

My symbols are indeed woven into the very texture of my life. And from my life two of them inspired the creation of a vignette…which is a short piece of writing or music, or a grouping of items, that clearly represents something or someone. 

This vignette clearly represents me, and a significant part of my journey. 

The Texture of My Life, Using Symbolism in Creating Vignettes

Surrender 67: Vintage Easter

One of the items, on my list of things to do at the Arkansas house today, was to gather up the Easter decorations. I don’t normally decorate for Easter, choosing instead to flow with the seasons, and focus on spring. However, I recently discovered Mimi Leta’s ceramic Easter pieces. The girls shared fond memories of those hand painted beauties, when they were at the house two weeks ago. I decided to bring the decorations home and use them in my vintage wooden sieve.

The two pieces painted by Leta are themselves vintage. I’m grateful she signed and dated the bottoms. The Easter egg covered dish and the rabbit were created 55 years ago.

I was nervous as I gently washed up the collection, lining my sink with thick dish towels, in case I dropped something. I saved the dish and rabbit until last, after gaining confidence as I washed the other pieces. As I cradled the clean rabbit, I noticed something I had never seen before…a hairline crack encircling his right ear.

I felt so relieved, as I realized this rabbit had been broken before, and glued back together. It’s endearing, knowing this brave little rabbit has survived a fracture. He’s wabi sabi, beauty in imperfection.

                                                    I’ll fill the egg dish with Jelly Belly jelly beans. 

In a few minutes, I had a fresh vignette in the wooden sieve. Every piece, except for the white footed bowl, came from Greg’s mom. I love the colorful shirred fabric eggs. The kids hid those when they were young. The delicate pink hankie and crocheted doilies I found tucked in a drawer. The fabric duck pillow, made from an old quilt, adds an interesting contrast to the ceramic pieces. And the little jewel green candle holder is the perfect finishing touch.

I brought back enough pieces today to create several vignettes throughout the house. Stay tuned for more delightful bursts of Easter!

Surrender 15: New Vignettes – 3D Collages

This week, post holiday decor, I’ve gradually been creating fresh vignettes in my vintage pieces. And I had fun with a new piece that I received as a Christmas gift. 

What occurred to me today, as I’ve also been working on my 2016 vision board this week, is the similarity between the two processes. I cut out images and words and arrange them on my board, capturing where I am currently in my journey. All of my dreams, big and small, are represented there as well. 

With the vignettes, I’m taking actual objects and arranging them in an eye pleasing way. These items are fun purchases, cherished heirlooms, repurposed treasures or family mementos that I love. They are pieces of my past, or my family’s past, arranged to tell new stories. 

 

The vintage suitcase got a new look. From Christmas I reused the old green pitcher with dried eucalyptus and red berries. The small dark red JOY pillow shifted to the suitcase as well. Returning to the suitcase from previous vignettes is the 116 year old china doll, the vintage tea cup and saucer, the trio of porcelain birds and the ruby red and dark green bud vases. A white candle and newspaper bird garland completed this freshened up look. 

 
I received this awesome wooden chest as a Christmas gift from my son Nate and daughter-in-law Megan. It is perfect for holding my growing collection of colored pencils and a couple of Daria Song coloring books. To complete the grouping I added an old photo of my Lauderdale grandparents, on their wedding day I believe. And an amber glass bud vase and candle holder that belonged to Greg’s mother. 

 

And finally, the vintage wooden sieve was redone. This is where the flow of life guided me. I added a white glass pitcher with rusty jingle bells and red berry picks that I repurposed from Christmas. A pair of plump white  birds are nestled on a vintage lace doily. I envisioned paperwhites growing from a pot, for the final piece. 

I often purchase these bulbs before the holidays and by Christmas the delicate, fragrant white flowers are in bloom. But I didn’t buy any this year, and suddenly, I wished I had. I could see, in my mind, that paperwhites would be the perfect accent for my sieve. 

I had to pick up a few groceries at the market and while there, I noticed a display of Christmas amaryllis kits marked down considerably. Interested I wheeled my cart over, and discovered ONE paperwhites kit, which included a pot, soil, moss and six bulbs. Those were surely my paperwhites! The bulbs were already sprouting, and in just a few days, they have grown tall and have blooms appearing. 

I love when a thought so quickly manifests into reality. And I was right! The paperwhites look perfect in the vignette.