Hearts Beat Loud at Bookhouse Cinema

I had the pleasure of viewing an indie film yesterday, at Joplin’s indie theater, Bookhouse Cinema. This is a movie review of the sweet film…and, creating a play on words, this is also an expression of gratitude for the fun and unique venue.

Hearts Beat Loud at Bookhouse Cinema

Hearts Beat Loud stars Nick Offerman, Kiersey Clemons, Toni Collette, Ted Danson, Sasha Lane and Blythe Danner. This drama was directed by Brett Haley, who co-wrote the screenplay with Marc Basch. The film carries a PG-13 rating, for brief language and drug references, and has a run time of 1 hour and 37 minutes.

Samantha (Clemons) is spending her final summer at home in Brooklyn, with her dad Frank (Offerman), before attending UCLA in the fall. She has big dreams and goals that will help her achieve her dream of becoming a doctor. Taking preparatory premed classes over the summer leaves her little time for fun or for socializing with her new friend Rose (Lane) or for hanging out with her dad.

Frank, a former small time musician, owns and operates a vintage record shop in the trendy Red Hook section of Brooklyn. But after 17 years business is almost nonexistent. Frank feels restless and ready for a change, and as a single dad, he is eager to spend time with his only child before she flies across the country.

Hearts Beat Loud at Bookhouse Cinema

During a weekly jam session with his daughter, who is a reluctant participant, Frank discovers that Sam has written a song. Titled Hearts Beat Loud, the beautifully haunting song conveys an innocent yet genuine longing for love and connection in a relationship. Together the dad/daughter duo record the song and Frank downloads it on Spotify, with surprising results.

During a summer filled with making memories and tough decisions, facing changes and holding on to relationships, Frank and Sam experience a few minutes together in the limelight, in the unique position of having a band together.

Hearts Beat Loud at Bookhouse Cinema

This fresh indie film also featured Toni Collette as Frank’s landlord/romantic interest, Ted Danson as a laid back bar owner who discovers living life on the edge, and Blythe Danner as Frank’s aging mom who has sticky fingers when she shops. The whole cast worked incredible well together, creating believable relationships and touching interactions.

The highlight of the film was the father/daughter connection between Frank and Sam. That delicate balance between loving a child and encouraging her to go for her dreams, and wanting to keep her a child and at home forever was played out with poignancy and humor. Greg and I watched the movie with our own daughter, with whom we’ve experienced that time of letting go, and our grandson who will be returning to the university next month for his sophomore year. Elissa, like all parents, has been in the role of the one who set off to create her own life, and the parent who has raised her child to pursue his own dreams. It was all bittersweet.

Hearts Beat Loud at Bookhouse Cinema

This story on the big screen unfolded before us in the perfect setting and atmosphere. I’ve attended Bookhouse Cinema for several indie films and documentaries and I adore this theater! The staff is friendly and helpful and the owners hard working and engaging. I love the comfortable theater room. And the adjoining pub offers a place to gather before or after the show. They serve high quality foods with vegan options, snacks, and an assortment of alcoholic and non alcohol drinks.

Hearts Beat Loud at Bookhouse Cinema

I love too that Bookhouse offers help yourself lemon/lime water or cucumber water, free of charge. Drinks and food can be eaten in the pub or carried into the theater to enjoy during the movie. Check out Bookhouse Cinema HERE to see upcoming movies and documentaries, and see their schedule for other in-house events. And then check them out in person. They are located at 715 E Broadway in Joplin.

It’s wonderful to have such a unique theater in my city, operated by people who care deeply about offering quality films and a quality experience to their patrons. Hearts really do Beat Loud at Bookhouse Cinema.

Hearts Beat Loud at Bookhouse Cinema

Movie Review: The Death of Stalin

I was excited this morning, when I spied a post from Joplin’s new indie theater, Bookhouse Cinema. The political satire film, The Death of Stalin, was playing this weekend! This is a movie I’ve been aware of for several months. The reviews have been excellent however, I figured I’d have to catch it later on Netflix.

Not so! Bookhouse listed movie times. I was in the full theater for the 4:15 showing this afternoon.

Movie Review The Death of Stalin

The Death of Stalin stars Steve Buscemi, Jeffrey Tambor, Simon Russell Beale, Adrian McLoughlin, Michael Palin, Jason Isaacs, Paul Whitehouse, Andrea Riseborough, Rupert Friend and Paul Chahidi. This dark comedy, directed by Armando Iannucci, is rated R for adult themes, language and violence, and has a run time of 1 hour and 47 minutes. The movie is adapted from the comic book by the same name, written by Thierry Robin and Fabien Nury. Iannucci co-wrote the screenplay.

The movie begins in March 1953. As he listens to a recording of a concert, and reads a note from an unhappy citizen, Josef Stalin (McLoughlin), doubles over in pain and falls to the floor. When he is found, barely clinging to life, the senior members of his Council of Ministers hastily gather to make important, far reaching decisions. As they jockey for power and position, Stalin dies…and chaos ensues.

Movie Review The Death of Stalin

The Council Members include Nikita Khrushchev (Buscemi), Deputy Malenkov (Tambor) who will assume leadership, Anastas Mikoyan (Whitehouse), Vyacheslav Molotov (Palin), Nicolai Bulganin (Chahidi), and Lavrenti Beria (Beale), head of the secret police.

Even though Malenkov steps into authority, he is beset by indecision and swings between emotional highs and lows. This polarizes the rest of the Council Members. Beria, a ruthless man who is responsible for the death of millions, has his own agenda, designed to seize control. The others attempt to safeguard their own lives while wavering between Malenkov and Beria.

Movie Review The Death of Stalin

Stalin’s children arrive to further add to the confusion. Daughter Svetlana (Riseborough) mourns her father and tries to keep her alcoholic brother Vasily (Friend) in check. And Field Marshall Zhukov (Isaacs) brings the stoic discipline of the military into the mix as the uncertainty within the council spills over to the country.

After Stalin’s funeral, the tension between the quarreling would-be leaders comes to a head, forcing decisions to be made that will affect a nation.

Movie Review The Death of Stalin

This was an amazing indie film. What can’t be discerned from my bare bones description above, is that this film is a comedy…a dark one, but full of humor nonetheless. The casting is brilliant, with great energy between the actors. The director made the decision early on to allow the actors to speak in their own accents, rather than attempt Russian ones. The result is Russian historical characters speaking in a mix of English and American accents…and it works.

The portrayals of these players struggling for power after Stalin’s death is over the top, which creates much of the humor, and yet they accurately convey historical events. I always fact check after watching a movie based on real people and real events. The Death of Stalin gets the important details in, although they compress the timeline somewhat.

Movie Review The Death of Stalin

I was amazed to discover that some of the craziest scenes were true! The concert that had to be repeated, after locking the audience into the room, happened…a bit differently than portrayed but Stalin did request a recording of the performance. After failing to set up the recording equipment, the radio manager made the musicians repeat the concert so that Stalin got his record.

Many people in Stalin’s Russia did crazy things, because they were afraid. The dark part of this comedy is realizing that the fear the people lived in was real. Being in the wrong place, witnessing the wrong thing, displeasing those in authority resulted in immediate execution, or worse, a slow torturous death at the hands of Beria and his men.

As a satire, this film works incredibly well. The humor is needed, or this would be a heavy movie to watch. I appreciated being able to break the tension through laughter. And I appreciated as well the glimpse into another country’s history. It’s good to be reminded occasionally of what has transpired in the past so that history does not repeat itself because we are unaware.

I look forward to seeing what Armando Iannucci presents next.

Movie Review The Death of Stalin