Home of the Tigers

On this gorgeous Saturday, I enjoyed watching three of my grandchildren participate in sporting events. Because of work and my recent travels, this was my first opportunity to watch granddaughter Aubrey cheer and grandsons Joey and Oliver play Tiger football. This was also my first time to watch the kids play and cheer within the beautiful new stadium built recently near the Carthage High School.

Here are highlights from the fun day:

I was grateful for my son and daughter-in-law’s pop up canopy that provided shade from the bright sunshine!

A peek at the new scoreboard during Joey’s game…and a vibrant field.

Joey didn’t get to play today. That’s him, number 4, cheering his team on and helping out from the sidelines. He is wearing a brace on his left leg. And the boy on crutches at the other end? That boy and Joey collided during a game two weeks ago. Joey injured his knee. The other boy suffered a broken ankle. Ouch for both of them!

Joey stretching out his leg. I was proud of my grandson. Although he didn’t play, he was attentive and encouraging and helped out by carrying water and tossing the football out. Joey’s team didn’t win but they played earnestly and well.

Watching Joey’s game.

Game 2, and Oliver takes the field as one of the team captains. He is number 3. This is Oliver’s second year to play, and what a difference a year makes. His team plays very well together, under the direction of excellent coaches.

Most of the time, Oliver plays on the defensive line. He is scrappy, and defends very well, blocking players on the other team and tackling, as necessary. His team won their game, without allowing the other team to score.

I appreciate how my son and daughter-in-law show up for their kids, cheering them on and being witnesses to their lives. Nate, who is a sergeant with the police department, was working today. That didn’t prevent him from stopping by the stadium to watch a little bit of the boys’ games and see his daughter cheer.

This is Aubrey’s first year as a cheerleader, although she has been observing and practicing in the bleachers for the last two years. She cheered with her squad during Oliver’s game and it was fun to watch both of them.

At halftime, the girls took to the field to perform a special cheer. I videotaped it, being the first time I’ve had opportunity to watch this darling girl and her friends cheer. You can watch their performance HERE.

I know the kids keep their parents busy, with practices every evening, except Fridays, and games on Saturdays. Nate and Megan are investing in their kids, allowing them to pursue interests and develop skills, and also determine what engages and calls to them next.

I’m proud of all of my grandchildren, for going after the things that are important to them. And I’m proud of my children, for parenting well, with their hearts, with their time and energy, with their presence.

It was a good day for football. It was a good day to be with family.

Tiger…Tiger

My intention in the last six days, has been to have lunch with each grandchild at his or her school. I have two reasons. This is the start of a new academic year and I enjoy visiting the kids at their schools and bringing them the lunches of their choice. And, I leave this Thursday on my trip to Ireland, Scotland and England. I wanted to see each of the grandkids before I go.

Last year, the four younger grands were in four different schools, requiring four separate lunch dates. This year, the younger two, Oliver and Aubrey, are in the same school. Today I met them in their cafeteria.

I am a frequent visitor to this school. They know me here. The school principal is the most interactive elementary school principal I have ever met. As I waited for Aubrey, who had the earlier lunch time, I watched with appreciation as he led second graders in songs and games. Wearing a mic, he wandered among the kids as they ate, calling them by name, asking questions, instigating fun. This school is quite a contrast to most that I’ve visited. Kids are allowed to chat and laugh as long as the noise level is kept tolerable.

Aubrey arrived and joined me at the lunch table. She requested a Jr Cheeseburger meal from Wendy’s. I noted her pink cheeks. She started cheerleading this year and spent Saturday cheering at Oliver and Joey’s football games. This bright eyed girl chatted about her school year and her schedule, cheerleading, making new friends and her family. She asked me about my upcoming trip and made me laugh when she asked if Scottish people wear clothes! She thought perhaps I might be wearing just my “birthday suit”.

The lunch schedule changed this year to an overlapping one for the grades, and I like it! That meant I had 15 minutes with Aubrey alone, and then Oliver’s 4th grade class arrived. For 10 minutes I got to be with both kids, one on each side of me. And then I had 15 minutes alone with Oliver. How perfect!

It was fun to be sitting between two spirited Tigers, which is the school’s mascot. Their colors are blue and white. The kids not only chatted with me, they enjoyed chatting with each other. The conversation turned to Halloween and costumes. In my family, it is never too early to discuss Halloween…and that day is Aubrey’s birthday as well! The theme for the family Halloween party is Criminal Insane Asylum, which promises to be spooktacular! Aubrey, Oliver and I were whispering about costume ideas and got the giggles as kids turned to listen in on our conversation. The school cafeteria is probably not the best place to be talking about insane historical figures!

Aubrey left with her class, after multiple hugs. I am thrilled she is having a great start to third grade.

As Oliver ate a Taco Bell lunch, he asked me lots of questions about real estate: What houses have I shown this past week? Which was my favorite? What is the biggest house I’ve been in? What house was the scariest? Oliver is the businessman/idea creator among my grandkids. He likes to think about new adventures and creative ideas. We were looking at houses together on the MLS, seriously, when it was time for him to go. He gave me a big hug and then politely tidied up our eating space before joining his classmates.

I am equally thrilled that Oliver is having a great school year and enjoying his second season of Tiger football.

I have one more lunch with one more grandchild. Tomorrow I join Joey at his school. I am grateful for these opportunities to visit with the kids, hear about their big little lives and get to know their teachers and friends. I am honored to be a witness to their journeys and to walk alongside them.

The Art of Hiding…and Finding…Painted Rocks

Two days ago, my grandchildren Aubrey, Oliver and Joey, and my great niece London, spent the afternoon painting rocks. Rock painting, and hiding them and finding them, is a fun creative activity trending across the US. The humidity was high Wednesday, extending the drying time of the paint.

After thunderstorms rolled through the area last night and early this morning, the weather today was perfect for being outside…mild, sunny, and breezy with low humidity. Sadly, London could not join us this afternoon. The other children and I gathered up the painted rocks and drove to Cunningham Park in Joplin to hide them.

Hiding painted rocks is much like hiding Easter eggs. You want them to be found. Each child carried a bag of rocks to hide around the park, while I followed along, snapping pics. The kids are so used to me documenting everything we do that they often pause for a photo op. I love that!

Included in our stash were two painted rocks the kids had found previously. These were hidden again in this new location.

Found by Aubrey at the Carthage Police Department

Found by Joey in the Joplin Public Library.

Here are pics of the kids hiding rocks:

Aubrey, Oliver and Joey thoroughly enjoyed hiding rocks. Clever Joey even painted one to resemble dog poop. I would love to see that one discovered!

As they hid rocks, tucking them into rock walls, carvings and bushes, and dropping them in easily spotted locations on the ground and atop park benches, the kids also looked for painted rocks. That's part of the appeal of this hobby.

They hid fourteen rocks. They found, and rehid, five!

We had such fun with this creative project this week. From painting the rocks, to hiding them at the park, to finding painted rocks created by others, this was a good way for the kids to express themselves artistically, in a low pressure, non competitive way. The children encouraged each other, when they painted. And today they stayed near each other as they explored the park, looking for hiding places and for hidden rocks. I enjoyed their sense of teamwork and accomplishment.

I will post pics of the rocks we hid and the ones we found, on the Joplin Area Rocks Facebook page. Check out the group, for fun ideas and to catch a glimpse of the craze that is rock painting. And then paint up some river rocks and come find me and my grandchildren in a park. We will hide rocks, and look for rocks, together.

The Art of Rock Painting

Rock painting is a thing. Walking in the park, shopping at the mall, strolling down Main Street I can glance down and find a painted rock tucked into a corner or peeking out from beneath a flowering plant. This growing trend of painting, hiding and finding rocks, has swept across the US. Chapters have formed in many cities, including Joplin.

The concept is simple. Paint a rock. You can create a design, an elaborate picture, write out an inspiring quote or go with an abstract painting. On the back of the rock, you write the name of your city's rock painting club, which has a page on Facebook. Joplin Area Rocks is the local chapter. Add the Facebook symbol. And then hide your painted rocks. The rocks are supposed to be easily spotted. Imagine a four year old hunting for these treasures. When you find a painted rock, you hide it again, in a new location, after admiring the artwork.

A rock I found last week at Mercy Park.

Today I spent time with three of my grandchildren…Joey, Oliver and Aubrey…and my great niece London. On our agenda was a first for all of us. We had a pile of river rocks, large flat pieces of shale, tempera paints in vivid colors and an assortment of artists brushes. We created our first painted rocks.

I put tarps down in the garage (thanks Papa Greg) and set up art supplies. The kids selected rocks, squeezed out paint on makeshift artists' palettes, and grabbed a brush. I managed to paint a simple heart on one small rock. I was busy the rest of the time snapping pics, handing out damp paper towels and chasing Carl the dog away from the paint.

I love these kids. They are so willing to try new things and enter into fun adventures. I allowed them complete freedom to paint their rocks as they wished. They all chose different designs and colors and methods of expression.

The kids created works of art. I set the rocks aside to dry while the artists changed into swimsuits and escaped the heat of the day by jumping into the pool. I was proud of them for their enthusiasm and their creativity.

The higher humidity today prevented the paint from drying quickly. We decided not to rush the process. We will hide the rocks on a different day. And while we are hiding painted rocks we will look for those hidden by others before us.

Rock painting is a thing. It is a fun thing!

Pickin’ on the Ranch

I love junk shows and I have been excited about a type of show new to the Joplin area that premiered this weekend. On this warm, gorgeous spring day, I collected my daughter-in-law Megan and grandchildren Joey, Oliver and Aubrey to check out the Pickin’ on the Ranch event in Carthage, MO. 

Pickin' on the Ranch
Picking is the act of selecting items for the purpose of reselling them. This profitable hobby has been made popular by the long running reality TV show, American Pickers. Picking is typically done among vast collections of junk and vintage items that people have stored in their houses, garages or barns. 

Today’s spring pickers market kicked off the first such event at the picturesque Civil War Ranch in Carthage. The barns, outbuildings and open grassy areas provided the perfect backdrop for vendors to display their pickings. 

Pickin' on the Ranch
Pickin' on the Ranch
This was a fun show to attend. And apparently we weren’t the only ones curious about a pickers market. The venue was packed. As we wandered through barns and booths I enjoyed looking at the many items for sale. These shows inspire my creativity and ignite my imagination. I am always impressed with how clever people are, as they repurpose vintage finds into new items. 

Pickin' on the Ranch
Pickin' on the Ranch

Pickin' on the Ranch
There was live music on site, food wagons to ease hunger and thirst, and celebrities from HGTV signing autographs. The atmosphere was friendly and casual. And there was even an animal adoption area where people could hold and pet dogs and puppies and perhaps take home a faithful companion as a found treasure. 

Pickin' on the Ranch
Pickin' on the Ranch
As much as I enjoyed looking at junk and vintage items and crafts, what I cherished most was watching my grandkids take in their first pickers market. They surprised me a couple of weeks ago by showing interest in the event when I mentioned it to them. As the spring pickers market approached, they continued to be excited about it and anticipated attending as well. I was delighted to take them and Megan along this morning. It was a fun outing. 

Pickin' on the Ranch
Pickin' on the Ranch
The kids were great shoppers. They each had an allotted amount to spend and made careful decisions about their purchases. I was proud of how polite they were to vendors and pleased with how interested they were in what was going on. 

Pickin' on the Ranch
Joey helped to keep an eye on his younger siblings, so we didn’t lose anyone in the crowds. He was called a “good man” by a vendor for retrieving an item that had fallen off of a display table and setting it up again correctly. 

Pickin' on the Ranch
Aubrey found lots to capture her interest, including these red lockers. I told her that her daddy had such a set of lockers when he was a boy, and that he stowed his police gear in them, items that he purchased or made in anticipation of his future career. Aubrey wanted to show that she could fit within those lockers too. 

Pickin' on the Ranch
Oliver made me laugh. The others were walking just a bit ahead of us when he asked to walk into a booth. “Sure, go ahead!” I said. “You’d better come in with me and keep an eye on me,” he quipped. “I think my mom would want you to keep an eye on me.” Amused by his honesty, I was happy to follow him around the booth, keeping an eye on him. He didn’t touch a thing! 

Pickin' on the Ranch
This first pickers market was a great success. I anticipate that the event will continue to grow and evolve into a highly anticipated yearly event. We didn’t make any huge purchases, but we all left with something special. I found a metal pendant and love the sentiment engraved on it…”the journey awakens the soul”. 

What a perfect expression of the day, and of my life. 

Pickin' on the Ranch

Wherever the Road May Lead

Kids are so inspiring. I picked up three of my grandchildren from school today, Joey, Oliver and Aubrey, and after our customary stop for drinks and snacks, the kids suggested a game. We would drive away from the house, and at every intersection, the kids would take turns choosing a direction. We would continue with this “pick a direction” game until time to head home, and then find our way back. 

It sounded like an adventure to me! 

Wherever the Road May Lead
After dropping off backpacks at their home, we loaded back into the car. The kids asked if they could each take their pet along. Carl the dog and the cats, Mittens and Nakoma, all well behaved when riding in the car, joined us. And off we went. 

Wherever the Road May Lead
Wherever the Road May Lead
Wherever the Road May Lead

Joey selected our direction at the first intersection…left. Aubrey chose the next course change…right. And Oliver’s choice was straight ahead. At each crossroad, the kids took turns deciding which way to go, and I drove accordingly. 

I added a requirement to the adventure. I asked each child to watch for something interesting, unusual or beautiful that caught their attention, and requested that they take a photo with my iPhone. They were willing participants. 

Wherever the Road May Lead
We drove on country roads, venturing out into areas unknown. The sky was overcast but the countryside, awakening with bursts of colors and tender shades of green, gave us plenty to talk about and ohhhh and ahhhh over. We quite unexpectedly ended up at the rustic gates of Camp Cyokamo. I’ve heard of this remote campground, but I’d never seen it before. I snapped a pic. The gates were open, an invitation to explore, and we circled the camp. 

Wherever the Road May Lead
This large glass greenhouse, beautifully lit up, caught the attention of all of us. I pulled over so Aubrey could capture this gorgeous surprise, which sparked our imaginations and initiated animated conversations. 

Wherever the Road May Lead
On one of the roads we wandered down, we came upon a property with row after row of old, rusty tractors. We all exclaimed over the site of so many farm vehicles and speculated about the collectors. Were they farmers? How long had they been buying old tractors? Joey took great photos. 

Wherever the Road May Lead
By now I had no idea where we were. We drove down gravel county roads, turned on paved lanes with names like Nutmeg and Redbud, and crisscrossed over rivers, or the same river many times, on concrete bridges. The pets had all curled up and fallen asleep. 

Wherever the Road May Lead

Wherever the Road May Lead
When my daughter-in-law texted to say she was headed home from work, we knew it was time to find our way back. I allowed each child to choose one more direction. And Oliver photographed an American flag rippling in the breeze. His grin alerted me that he had shifted his focus, sneaking in a close up of Yaya at the wheel!

Wherever the Road May Lead
I am grateful that my phone has a GPS! I not only didn’t know where we were, I didn’t know how to find my way back. As I now drove following Siri’s directions, I was surprised to realize how far north and west we had gone. In a few minutes, however, we crossed a familiar highway and I got my bearings. We arrived home just ahead of Megan. 

What a fun game we played, and what adventurous and innovative grandchildren I have. What I enjoyed the most was that the kids were engaged and we had fun chatting and laughing. There were no electronics going in the car…no YouTube videos playing, no electronic games in use, no apps being downloaded. We talked. And wondered about things. And let random directions guide us to new sights. 

It was fun. It was the adventures of Yaya and Joey and Oliver and Aubrey…and Carl and Nakoma and Mittens. I look forward to playing this game again!

Wherever the Road May Lead

Character Kid Award

One of the joys of being a grandmother, a Yaya, is being present when my grandchildren are recognized for accomplishments. I’ve had the honor of being in the audience for all five of my grandkids at various times, as they receive awards or special recognition. I believe it is important to be a witness to their young lives, so they know that I am there, cheering them on. 

Character Kid Award
This afternoon, I was in the audience at my grandson’s elementary school award assembly, as a witness to Oliver’s life. At Steadley, the children adopt a character word for each month, and memorize a quote about it. They put that character quality into practice during the month as well. January’s character word was Perseverance. 

Character Kid Award

The teachers in each grade select students from their classrooms who best demonstrate the month’s character word. Oliver was selected by his teacher for the award. The children don’t know who has been chosen, until the assembly. I was joined in the auditorium by Greg, and my son Nate and daughter-in-law Megan, all there as Team Oliver. 

Character Kid Award
Character Kid Award
The assembly was presided over by Dr. Barlow, the school principal. Dr. Barlow is the most inspiring and engaging principal I have ever met. His love for others is evident. He interacts with the kids, leading them in fun songs, and asking pop questions. To hear several hundred children recite the Preamble to the US Constitution together, under his direction, is always deeply moving. All assemblies at Steadley begin thus. 

Before the awards were handed out, the school bus drivers were recognized. What an amazing tribute! I don’t believe I have ever seen bus drivers so cheerfully and sincerely thanked for their devotion and dedication. It was during this segment of the assembly that I realized that recognition is a powerful way to make life a little more tender for others. 

Character Kid Award
There was robust clapping and cheering as each child’s name was announced for the Character Kid awards. I was thrilled for Oliver. This third grader has changed so much in the last year. He still loves for me to time him as he rides his bike, and when he’s tired he enjoys snuggling up under his favorite blanket. 

However, I see the young man emerging. I appreciate his entrepreneurial spirit and his big ideas. I  love listening to him share those dreams and watching as he comes more and more into who he is created to be. Perseverance? Yes, this boy can be persistent in going after what he wants. 

Character Kid Award

When children are toddlers, and forming a sense of self, they love to have an audience. “Watch me!” they call out, “Look at me!” What they are really saying is see me. It is an invitation to appreciate who they are and what they can do. Oh, they may not fully realize that, but it’s what we all long for, to be seen, and appreciated. 

I am applauding and cheering and being a witness, for my children and grandchildren. Way to challenge yourself, Oliver, and persevere. I am so wonderfully proud of you. And I will always be watching. 

Character Kid Award

Happy Birthday Oliver

Today the last two members of my family both celebrated birthdays. Among my large family, this is the only occurrence of shared birthdays, and interestingly, they happened at the end of the year, creating a big finish. So I can focus on each person, I’m writing two blog posts today. 

This is my grandson Oliver’s birthday post. 

After winter weather moved in yesterday, I was unsure whether Oliver and I would get to enjoy our birthday lunch and shopping trip today. Although the sun was bright, helping to clear the roads of their icy layer, the temperature never rose above 14 degrees. My son and daughter-in-law and I discussed the situation via text messaging, and agreed the roads were safe. The birthday outing was on! 

Before meeting Megan in Joplin, to pick up Oliver, I looked up his name. 

“Oliver, you are learning to develop patience, and discovering that perseverance is a trait worth cultivating. You are good at absorbing knowledge and retain it well. While you can be charming or play it cool, most often you are a mixture of both. People don’t realize that you tend to hold things inside and suffer in silence until you can’t remain silent any longer, then you may express yourself strongly. 

You desire to inspire and lead, to control what others do. You are giving, courageous and bold, action oriented, energetic and strong willed. You truly want to make a difference in the world, and this attitude draws you to cultural interests, politics, social issues, and the cultivation of your creative talents.


I see the truth in these words about this handsome, active boy, who turned nine today. Patience hasn’t been a word I have associated with Oliver. And yet…I have seen this child grow and change so much this past year. He is learning that sometimes you go after what you want. And sometimes, you wait and the perfect opportunity arises. He is incredibly bright, remembering well what he learns. And most definitely Oliver can turn on the charm and dazzle people with his big smile. Or he can hold back, coolly appraising others or situations, weighing options before he acts. 


The section about holding things inside is true as well, something I’ve come to understand about Oliver recently. He is more shy and reserved than people at first realize. This sensitive boy has come to trust me, and with that trust, he has opened his beautiful heart and shared more about how he thinks and what he feels. New people, especially, or being in a crowd of strangers, can make him feel uncomfortable and less likely to engage with others. I appreciate Oliver’s honesty. 

When we are together, such as we were today, I don’t make him talk to people that he doesn’t know. If he wants to engage or answer a question a well meaning store associate or waitress asks, that’s totally up to him. I’m finding that if I will talk to the new person first, keeping a friendly and casual conversation going, Oliver is much more likely to join in on his own, and feel good about that. Everyone is unique. I’m grateful for this grandson’s perspectives and gifts and how he relates to the world. 


Today we enjoyed lunch at IHOP, where Oliver put away a stack of pancakes. We chatted about a broad range of topics. Rather than spend his birthday cash all on toys or on one big item, he asked if we could go to the mall. There is a place set up there, with cords and pulleys and trampolines, where the adventurous can bounce and somersault and leap high into the air. That’s what Oliver most wanted to do. 


And that is so like this energetic boy. He loves to move…run, climb, jump, do tricks…and he likes having an attentive and appreciative audience! Courageous, bold and action oriented all describe Oliver well. He used some of his birthday money to rig up and jump for 10 minutes, that infectious grin on his face, his athletic form spinning effortlessly into somersaults and back flips. I cheered and took pics and video, capturing his fun, capturing Oliver, and who he is at this moment. 


I have no doubt this boy will become a leader of others or a creator of big ideas. As I drove him home, he examined the one toy that he purchased at the mall…a hovering UFO type craft that is controlled with hand movements…and allowed his imagination to spark, thinking up possible inventions. Someday this kid, who is learning to channel his energy in remarkable ways, will come up with a million dollar idea that benefits many. I will enjoy seeing who he becomes and what he creates as he grows up. 

Happy birthday, Oliver. I love you so much! 

Christmas Shopping with Oliver

As Christmas approaches, it is time for a tradition that I initiated last December…taking each of my five grandchildren out for dinner and shopping. These outings allow me to have one-on-one time with the kids and the children have an opportunity to buy gifts for their family members. 



I picked up Oliver after school and off we went. The kids make the decisions about where to shop, what to buy, and where to eat for dinner. Oliver is the middle child in his family. He is used to his older brother or younger sister calling the shots. He politely asked me questions about what I thought we should do. However, when I returned the decision making back to him, he grinned and quickly picked out two stores to shop in. 


Oliver selected great gifts for his family, in a minimal amount of time. On the way to Freddy’s, his choice for dinner, we played a game of “What’s your favorite…”. We both like the color blue. My favorite movie is the Lord of the Rings Trilogy. His current favorite is the recent Middle School comedy. I like to vacation in Scotland. He enjoys Florida and Branson. 


We discussed school and Christmas and football over dinner. I was thrilled to discover that Freddy’s has a veggie burger on their menu. I tossed the bun. Oliver was brave and tried a bite of my unconventional burger. He not only picked up our meals when our number was called, he also cleared our table after we ate. 



Our fun evening concluded at my house, where Oliver wrapped his purchases. He likes all the plants that I have in my house. “You live in a greenhouse, Yaya!”. He’s right! 

I treasure these times with the grandchildren. Each child gets my full attention. I get to engage in lively conversations and hear that child’s unique thoughts about life and the world. Oliver bemoaned the fact that he still has seven years before he can drive. I am quite content for him to be a child for a while longer. I know how quickly the years will pass. All too soon he will be waving that driver’s license and heading off on new adventures. Even then, though, we will have dinner together and go Christmas shopping, Oliver and Yaya. He’s already offered to drive. 

Saturday Night at Roller City

I’ve definitely had a roller skating theme going on this weekend. Last night’s high school musical, Xanadu, had roller skating as a key element of the story. And this evening I ended up at Joplin’s Roller City with three of my grandchildren while my son and his wife had a date night. 

Roller City was the place to be tonight. There was a happy crowd of kids and teens, parents with youngsters and a few grandparents watching from the safety of the sidelines. After a quick dinner at Chick-Fil-A we arrived ready to join the roller party. 




The kids had a blast. The boys soon switched to in-line skates, eager to give them a try. And Aubrey started off with a trainer to help her keep her balance, but she quickly abandoned that skating aid and was zooming around the floor without it. 

I watched from the comfy bench on the sidelines, content to cheer kids on, offer drinks of cold water and snap pics. In typical fashion, Aubrey made a new friend before she even stepped onto the shiny wooden floor. She and Bella were inseparable until Bella had to leave, and then amazingly, two of Aubrey’s classmates appeared to keep her company. 


The boys were adventurous as they mastered the in-line skates. They kept a watchful eye on their little sister and perfected their techniques. I timed them as they made loops around the floor and gave them frequent thumbs up signs as they beamed at me on their way by. 

All three kids fearlessly participated in every event and game. I was very proud of their efforts and determination. Oliver explained that even if he didn’t win a race, it was good practice. What a great attitude. 


Watching them, listening to the pop songs blaring overhead and the whirring sound of skate wheels on the wooden floor, I was transported back to my childhood in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where my sisters and I spent Saturday afternoons or evenings at Skateland. I loved skating. 

I realized tonight that skating, like swimming, was a form of meditation to me. No matter how crowded the pool or the rink, I created my own solitary bubble around me, finding a way to be alone amid so many people. The almost hypnotic act of skating around and around the rink freed my mind to think and ponder while my body settled into a rhythm. 


I miss skating, having given it up after the car accident 21 years ago. I feel so good now, so healthy and fit, that I was tempted tonight to pull on a pair of skates. 

Soon. Soon I will. The kids and I agreed that we need to visit Roller City often, and bring their cousins Jonathan and London with us next time. I’ll let the whir and swoosh of the skates keep calling to me, until I am ready to answer. And then watch out kids, Yaya is going to take to the floor.